Posters 4: Prostate Cancer I

Sunday June 30, 2019 from 07:30 to 09:00

Room: QCCC - 206 A

MP-4.11 Prostate Cancer Canada electronic-library for Improved Function (eLIFT): The construction of the platform and initial analysis for patients’ satisfaction.

Joseph Chin, Canada

Professor of Urology & Oncology
Department of Urology and Oncology
Western University, London Health Sciences Centre

Abstract

Prostate Cancer Canada electronic Library for Improved Function (eLIFT): The construction of the platform and initial analysis for patients’ satisfaction

Khalil Hetou1, Kristin Tangen-Steffins2, Shiva Nair1, Khurram Siddiqui1, Nelson Leong 2, Hon Leong1, Chan Garson1, Jennifer Goulart2, Joseph Chin1.

1Urology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; 2Radiation Oncology, BC Cancer, Victoria Centre, Victoria, BC, Canada

Prostate Cancer Canada.

Introduction: A Movember/Prostate Cancer Canada joint initiative developed an online platform (electronic Library for Improved Function, eLIFT) for patients planned to undergo prostate cancer (PCa) treatment. The platform includes video library tailored to treatment of choice. Herein, we describe this tool and assess its impact on patients' satisfaction, knowledge, and self-efficacy.

Methods: eLIFT included 22 videos in English and French. Content ranges from “Overview of radical prostatectomy (RP)” to “Risks and bowel habit changes of radiotherapy (RT).” Others are generic (e.g., pelvic floor muscle training). Two sites were involved: Patients at site A were to undergo RT, whereas patients at site B were to undergo RP. In both sites, the first group of patients recruited did not have access to eLIFT (standard of care [SOC] and a subsequent group of patients were recruited with access to eLIFT. Questionnaires were based on validated quality of life (QoL) survey instruments (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite [EPIC] 16, EQ-5D-5L, BI-B)

Results: Forty-four patients were recruited to SOC and 23 to eLIFT intervention at site A. Forty-three patients were recruited to SOC and 20 to eLIFT at site B. At site A, 78% of patients in the eLIFT arm agreed strongly that information given at time of consultation was helpful in improving their knowledge of urinary and bowel side effects and management compared to 59% in the SOC arm; 7% in the eLIFT arm reported that they experienced a side effect that they did not expect compared to 32.4 % in the control arm. Sixty-four percent of patients in the eLIFT group strongly agree that eLIFT was generally helpful in improving their knowledge of urinary and bowel side effects, and 66% strongly agreed that eLIFT was generally helpful in improving management of urinary and bowel side effects. Over 74% of patients in the eLIFT arm strongly agreed the eLIFT was generally helpful in improving their knowledge of urinary and bowel side effects.

Conclusions: Survey analysis showed promising patient satisfaction and empowerment results with eLIFT. This appears to be a good medium for knowledge transfer and patient empowerment. 



© 2019 CUA 74th Annual Meeting