UP-169 Research productivity and impact of Canadian academic urologists: national trends in academic metrics as it relates to gender, subspecialty, and faculty appointment
Thursday June 27, 2019 from
TBD
Presenter

Rebecca Joy Power, Canada

Medical Student

Memorial University

Abstract

Research productivity and impact of Canadian academic urologists: National trends in academic metrics as it relates to gender, subspecialty, and faculty appointment

Rebecca Power1, Jason Hearn1, Stuti M Tanya1, Sanjay Sharma2, Ashley R. Cox3, Michael K. Organ4.

1Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL, Canada; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada; 3Department of Urology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; 4Division of Urology, Discipline of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL, Canada

Introduction: There are multiple metrics of academic success and productivity. The objective of this study was to quantify research productivity of academic Canadian urologists on the basis of h-index, number of citations, and publications as they correlate with gender, subspecialty, and faculty appointment.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of academic urologists from Canadian academic institutions with a postgraduate program in urology. Academic urologists and faculty appointments were identified from university websites. Gender was determined from publicly available physician databases. H-indices, number of citations, and publications were collected from Scopus. Descriptive, univariate, and multivariate statistics were used to analyze the relationship of h-index, number of citations, and publications with faculty appointment, subspecialty, and gender. 

Results: A total of 242 academic urologists were identified. The means were 16.4±16.7 for h-index, 1995±402 for number of citations, and 79±157 for number of publications per individual. The subspeciality of uro-oncology had the highest academic metrics. Full professor appointments had significantly higher h-indices (p<0.001). There were large discrepancies noted in gender; male urologists had significantly higher h-indices (p=0.006), 94.2% of urology professors were male, and the subspecialities of male fertility and transplant had no female representation in the collected database. Female reconstruction (28.0%) and pediatrics (27.8%) had the greatest female representation, as well as the the second and third highest h-indices, among all subspecialties. 

Conclusions: There are large gender disparities in faculty appointment, and academic metrics in Canadian urology. This study is the first to show that subspecialities with higher female representation maintain a high level of research productivity as measured by h-index, number of citations, and publications.


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